Meet the most popular  TV  & Host | Frankie Cena

Meet the most popular TV & Host | Frankie Cena

Meet the most popular TV & Host | Frankie Cena The Untold Story of Frankie Cena From Champion Debater to Mr. World |

From Champion Debater to Mr. World: The Untold Story of Frankie Cena From Champion Debater to Mr. World: The Untold Story of Frankie Cena From Champion Debater to Mr. World: The Untold Story of Frankie Cena From Champion Debater to Mr. Frankie is a multitalented individual who has participated in a variety of competitions, including singing for Mr. World, debates, and even hosting Miss World; We delve into Frankie’s busy life.

How did you get here?

I enjoy splitting up my stories into two parts. The first is about a young boy who loved speaking in front of people and eventually started his own business, Fostering Debate Talent (FDT) Academy. I was a debater and public speaker in high school, and I worked as a debate and public speaking coach in college. My students performed exceptionally well, traveling throughout Canada and the globe and winning numerous championships. As a result, I was able to establish a debate coaching business entirely under my own name. We are about to enter our second year, and I couldn’t be happier with the business’s growth, the number of people we are affecting, and the fact that I get to work with my mother and sister, both of whom are crucial to the operation.

My second chapter is about a young boy who has always had a passion for performing and eventually became the host of Miss World, the oldest and largest beauty pageant in the world. I pursued acting, modeling, and hosting in addition to taking singing lessons and performing on stages all over the world to get there. I ended up representing Canada at the Mr. World competition, where I was extremely fortunate to win the talent competition and finish in the top 10. Even more fortunate, I was asked to host the following season of Mr. World two years later; and to serve as Miss World 2014’s host later that same year. Since I take both my coaching and performance careers very seriously, a lot of my story up to this point has been about trying to be absolutely successful in both.

How did you become interested in singing?

I get this question a lot, and the truth is that I have no idea why I enjoy singing so much. I don’t think I have any major life events or singing role models that helped me become a singer. I only know that when I was young, I wrote songs with my neighbors, watched American Idol every night, begged my music teacher to let me join the choir a year early, and was always certain that this was my dream.

However, as a child, I also recall losing numerous singing competitions. Therefore, even though I was most committed to it, I wasn’t always the best at it, and I had to put in a lot of effort. In order to win those singing competitions, I had to keep going back to them; to get myself on some of the world’s biggest stages; and finally, to be crowned Mr. World Talent.

Why did you decide to start a business coaching debates?

There was not really a culture for teaching speech and debate through a formalized training program before opening a debate academy in Vancouver. After seeing piano lessons, after-school English and math tutoring, and kids joining sports teams, I wondered why there wasn’t an elite academy for those who aspire to be the best public speakers and debaters in the world. for lawyers and politicians of the future? I knew I had to fill a huge gap in the market in Vancouver—and all over the world—and that now was the right time to do so.

However, I never really intended to start a debate coaching business; it was more of a passion, a volunteer project, or perhaps a part-time job. After I auditioned for The Apprentice UK, that really changed. After completing a lot of work throughout the Apprentice UK process, I was asked to present a business plan in the final round. Debate coaching was the only thing that came to mind. Even though I was turned down for The Apprentice, I still ended up with this amazing business model, which made me start to consider the possibility that “Maybe this isn’t just a hobby, maybe this isn’t just a passion—maybe this is a business that needs to be implemented, in Vancouver.”

How do you manage to run a successful business while maintaining your love of performing?

This used to really bother me. I was persuaded for a while that there had to be a master plan for my career, and that I had to mentally balance my love of singing with my love of business and public speaking. Should I pursue my singing aspirations or attend college? Do I want to try my hand at being a television host or become a lawyer?” I think I’ve realized, at the age of 26, that it’s much smarter to simply keep my eyes and ears open for opportunities and seize them whenever they present themselves.

I remember wondering, “What am I supposed to do?” when Miss World asked me to work for them when I was just starting my business. I’m opening this academy, and Miss World has contacted me to request that I fly away for ten weeks. The hardest decision was this one. But I knew that a contract with Miss World didn’t come along every day, and I had to accept it because now was the right time to advance my entertainment career. Therefore, I was also quick to strike when the going got tough, even though I didn’t anticipate that many of the breaks I got in singing, acting, hosting, and debate would come up at all. In addition, I believe that my ability to allow my career to develop naturally has aided in building a successful business and maintaining my dream.

What are your top three business-related lessons?

First point: Treat your clients and staff as family. This was not something I had planned before I started my business, it was not part of a strategy, and I was not taught or told to do it. Simply because I thought it was right. However, what I eventually discovered was that clients and employees will be more likely to invest in you—to invest their trust, time, energy, and resources into making your vision a reality—if you treat them like family and invest in them.

Second point: Understand when to let go. I have almost entirely relied on myself throughout my career as a debate coach. As a result, now that I’m 26 and about to begin my tenth year as a coach, it’s been harrowing to watch our numbers grow because growth means that I can’t do everything. It means that I won’t be able to teach every student at all times, that I won’t be able to meet with every parent, that I won’t be able to supervise every class, or that I will have to let go of things that I have held so dearly to myself for so long. I let go by training and trusting my staff, believing that they will carry on my brand and skillset.

Third lesson: Work harder still. I will never forget the trips to Mexico and Newfoundland, both from London, England; judging a Miss World competition, training students, and coaching debate in one. However, if you want your business to be successful, you need to put in as much effort as you can. Therefore, yes, that entails boarding flights for individual meetings and returning to work late at the office with my mother and sister to plan our company gala. Work never ends. However, I am aware that no one else will if I do not invest that time as owner.

Which has been your greatest setback?

I truly detest failure because I believe that every time I fail at something, I learn something new. However, my first point is that the word “failure” implies that something bad has occurred or that I was unable to gain anything positive from the experience.

However, if I had to choose one thing about which I am dissatisfied, it would probably be being eliminated from the X Factor UK. 4 times. I told the producers the first time that I have always loved Simon Cowell and wanted to sing for him. I told them that I had met Simon in real life at an X Factor USA audition in Los Angeles, where I sang to a standing ovation but he didn’t hear me sing. As a result, I pulled Simon Cowell over after the performance and told him, “I’m going to sing for you one day.” I explained to them that was what brought me there.

And you would think that my talent and this story would have brought me straight to Simon Cowell’s judging table. It didn’t, though. So I tried out again the following year, got through all of the stages, got called back, and was told to send in my songs so I could go sing for Simon, but I just didn’t make it. Additionally, this occurred a third and fourth time.

Therefore, the number of doors that have been shut against me is significantly greater than the number of times I have succeeded. That is the truth as well. Even though that is disappointing, I will continue to practice what I preach and return five, six, and seven times—until I sing for Simon Cowell!

Tell us about your experience hosting Miss World and what you’ve learned from it.

The most amazing and shocking experience of my life was hosting Miss World. I was completely ignorant of hosting and beauty pageants. Therefore, I had to learn voiceovers, script writing, earpieces, reading autocue, teleprompter, live hosting, recorded hosting, interviews, and in-depth interviews all on the spot in addition to meeting 125 women from all over the world with varying stories, goals, and aspirations. The Miss World organization has given me fans, followers, my dream job, and most importantly, the knowledge and training I need to become the ultimate host I’ve always wanted to be—like Jeff Probst and Ryan Seacrest.

Don’t be afraid to fight if you’re thrown to the wolves, that’s all I can say. You might change completely and become stronger as a result.

What has been the proudest moment of your life thus far?

The fact that I won the Mr. World Talent competition has been the proudest moment of my life thus far. When I entered Mr. World, I was surrounded by so many accomplished, amazing, beautiful men from all over the world, and I was constantly wondering if I was good enough. I had so many doubts, fears, and insecurities. But when the talent portion started, I felt like I was finally living my childhood dream of appearing on American Idol or America’s Got Talent. I felt this incredible excitement. Rounds were conducted. There were removals. There was even a finale and the final decision of the judges after we went from 50 contestants to 20 contestants to 10 to 5. Therefore, when I won, despite all of the negative thoughts that had been swirling in my head before, it simply redeemed a lifetime of dedication, improvement, and progress toward what I can only describe as my life’s dream for me.

What plans or projects do you have for the future of your personal life, business, or entertainment?

In terms of business, FDT academy will finally have its own commercial space when it begins its second year in September. This is the progression from teaching at my house, teaching at the homes of clients, and teaching in a large client’s residential property to finally having our own storefront, signage, and home. We are already looking forward to an amazing September school year with many new clients, and I can’t wait to grow the business.

I hope to be back with the Miss World team for the entertainment aspect, building on the success of the Miss World “Head-to-Head Challenge,” which I was invited to lead and work on last season. In order to accomplish that, I hope to be able to return to the competition in Sanya, China, where the contestants are competing.

I also have another project in the works in the UK that could bring me one step closer to achieving my singing goals; however, due to a contract, I am unable to share any additional information at this time; instead, stay tuned.

What kind of impression or message do you hope to make on young people who want to follow their dreams?

If you’re a young person who wants to follow your dreams, my recommendation is to do so. But following a dream doesn’t just mean thinking about it once or twice, once a month, when you’re bored, happy, or excited, or any number of other times. It indicates that you keep that dream in your mind clearly at all times. It indicates that you pursue it to the fullest and believe in it even when times are tough. It also requires you to envision yourself as larger than Ryan Seacrest, Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Versace, or anyone else you can think of. If you don’t, no one else will ever be able to.

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